Before

Before

After (Hair by Jonathan)

After (Hair by Jonathan)

Before

Before

After (Hair by Jonathan)

After (Hair by Jonathan)

Before

Before

After (Hair by Aura)

After (Hair by Aura)

Before (never colored greying hair)

Before (never colored greying hair)

After (Grey Reduction highlights - Hair by Jonathan)

After (Grey Reduction highlights - Hair by Jonathan)

You call that pink?

September 17, 2008

A diagram of the EM spectrum, showing the type...Image via Wikipedia

You may have been in the salon when the hairdressers are debating the interpretation of a particular shade of blonde.  “It’s a bit orange.”  “No, I really think it’s gold.”  “Get a piece of white paper so we can compare it.”

Yup.  We are color geeks.  A client made a comment about her red purse and we all instantly began giving our opinion of what color the purse was.  Orange.  Salmon.  Adobe.

In the spirit of your hair color geeks, I have an article to share with you about Pink and how our brain makes it up.  Enjoy!

The light spectrum has a colour missing because it does not feel the need to ‘close the loop’ in the way that our brains do. We need colour to make sense of the world, but equally we need to make sense of colour; even if that means taking opposite ends of the spectrum and bringing them together.

Read the rest of the article here.

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Aura’s new hair

August 26, 2008

As you all know, I am not one to keep the same color for long.  I have had brown hair since the spring after my husband mentioned that he didn’t think he had ever seen me in brown hair.  I was also growing it under the mistaken notion that I would enjoy doing different things with it.  Alas, it ended up in a pony tail every day.

Monday I had to teach a class in Wenatchee, WA with my good friend, Jessee Skittral who said he had a vision for my hair.  SInce I was lacking a vision, I went to his salon on Sunday to get a whole new me.

In the spirit of the classic before and after photos, I have looked as frumpy and unhappy as possible in my before picture.

Before

Before

After

After

The bulk of the hair is colored a dark copper gold and the accent panels are a color melt of yellow, gold, copper, pink and red.  I can wear the brigh panel visible on top, or by changing my part, it can shimmer and peek out from underneath.  And there is another little patch at the bottom behind one ear as well for balance.

Also After

Also After

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Pigments for sale on market stall, Goa, India.Image via Wikipedia

Sometimes when we talk to laypersons (non hairdressers) we discover that they have no idea that changing from one color to another requires more thought and effort than simply dumping on the desired new shade.  Or our clients tell us stories of strangers who will ask them “What color is on your hair?” so that they can go and purchase a box of that shade.  If only it were that simple.

We do our best to educate the outside world on the intricacies of our craft. Haircolor is an art and a science.  There is chemistry impacting the physical fibre that is the hair and a skilled colorist can anticipate what is going to happen as well as correct unfavorable outcomes.  That is why you pay us instead of doing it in your bathroom.

Say hello to our dear friend Kris Blondin. (You know that it is our general policy not to identify clients on the blog, but Kris has a visible online presence and is never publicity shy.) You may remember her from one of our ” Last week’s interesting hair” posts.

When we last saw Kris, her hair was much darker. (Not to mention longer!)

Beehive for Zoobilee

Beehive for Zoobilee

To take Kris from her deep brown based color we first had to decolorize the hair.  That means removing some of the artificial pigment and lightening the natural pigment (chemical lighteners break up the hair’s melanin and diffuse it so that light travels through and our eyes sees it as lighter.)

Once we had made the hair light enough that the new color would be able to be seen, we applied our desired shades in an alrtful pattern.

Placement of Elumen shades in foil

Placement of Elumen shades in foil

Haircolors are naturally deeper and cooler at the scalp, so our color at the base is equal parts dark brown and pure red (Elumen NB@4 and RR@all.)  On the lengths of the hair, one side is pink (Elumen PK@all) and one side is yellow (Elumen YY@all)  Wher the colors meet, an additional shade is created.

  1. Pink
  2. Pink mixes with brown and red
  3. Brown and red
  4. yellow
  5. yellow mixes with brown and red
  6. pink mixes with yellow

Each foil has a slightly different pattern.  the yellow may be just at the tips, or may be a chevron shape into the pink, etc.  When it is all done, here is the fabulous end result.  We will keep Kris this shade for 3-6 months.  For maintenance, we will apply the brown red at her re-growth each month.  When she tires of this shade, we will go through the process again to create something new and exciting.

Hair by Aura
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When you are in the salon, you may feel like you are in a different country where a different language is spoken. Hairdressers speak a language of color that may be unfamiliar to you if you have had no art training.

I found this amazing, in-depth article at Colour Lovers that explains the color wheel (the basis of all the work we do with hair color.)

Not only will this help you understand what we mean when we talk about your hair, it will help the next time you need to pick paint of fabric for your decorating needs.

The first color wheel has been attributed to Sir Isaac Newton, who in 1706 arranged red, orange, yellow, green, blue, indigo, and violet into a natural progression on a rotating disk. As the disk spins, the colors blur together so rapidly that the human eye sees white. From there the organization of color has taken many forms, from tables and charts, to triangles and and wheels the history.

Read the rest of the article here.

Haircolor technique videos

February 21, 2008

A friend of mine (you may recognize him from my post on skin tone) has been putting up a selection of haircolor technique videos on YouTube. Click on over and subscribe to his feed, then you can get notified by email when a new one goes up!

Here is the newest one.

Color drama du jour

February 14, 2008

Today is Valentine’s Day and, coincidentally, the salon’s 17th anniversary. We always celebrate with champagne and chocolates. (Did you know you can live on champagne and chocolate for a day?) Today we also had a little corrective color drama.

Corrective color is the most difficult thing a professional haircolorist does. It requires a combination of skill, knowledge, critical thinking and sometimes luck. I like to think that my success in this arena is due more to my critical thinking than to any other aspect. Sometimes you have to spend a few minutes thinking through your options before jumping into the project.

Here was the problem:

before Read the rest of this entry »

I found this article that might interest you. It is not a hair based website, but a site for designers about all types of colors. There is some very good information here about the history of haircolor as well as a little bit of chemistry and might make conversations with your haircolorist more clear. I do have a few things that I want to clarify, however:

Permanent Color
The longest-lasting of hair dyes, permanent color cannot be washed out. It contains both ammonia and peroxide, which raise the cuticle of the hair in order to allow the tint to penetrate to the cortex and lighten the hair by breaking up the melanin that gives hair its natural color, fundamentally changing the shade of the hair. Since the color is (true to its name) permanent, bringing hair back to its original color requires a new dye job.* Read the rest of this entry »

Don’t be afraid of color

September 14, 2007

Historically, the only people wearing haircolors outside the realm of “naturally occurring on someone” were musicians and street punks. But the times they are a changing, my friends. This is the first in a series of photos of regular people (with regular jobs) who wear color that used to be considered “punk”.

This client works in local government.

pink hair

This client owns a restaurant.kris zoobilee 2006img_0085.jpg

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